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SNES Can these SNES JR consoles be repaired?

Michael0526

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I was hoping someone might be able to provide some guidance on possibly repairing these SNES boards. So I have recently learned to solder and have been practicing quite a bit. I have been able to successfully install XenoGC mod chips into gamecubes, and thought an RGB amp installation would be rather simple and a good "next step". Both of these were purchased on eBay with the seller being fully transparent about them not working, but not to the extent of the condition they are in. Both are from botched RGB amp installs, on the 1st console (Console A) the pad is lifted from the CPUN chip pin, and the underside is missing a pad as well. The vias are filled with solder, I tried using a soldering wick to clear them but am unable to do so. On the 2nd console, (Console B) you can clearly see the scorched board, missing pins, pads, and traces. The underside is more of the same. I would imagine console 1 would be easier and more practical to repair, I just don't know how to go about getting the pad repaired, or if I would still be able to install an RGB amp, which is ultimately what I want to do. It was recommended to me to use bodge wires, for console 2, by running them to other traces/pads; and again with this one, I don't even know where to begin or which traces I would be able to run wires to. As far as equipment, I do have a microscope along with a yoctosun magnified headpiece. Are either of these repairable, or should I just count my losses and buy a working SNES to RGB mod. Photos attached are labeled for Console A (SNES-A) and Console B (SNES-B) the BTM is abbreviation for bottom. Any insight would be greatly appreciated!
 

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StevO9389

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I don't know about B but A definitely looks fixable. If finding the traces is all you need then this guy has you covered: Strip Club [PCB SCANS]. Hope that helps.
 

segasonicfan

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Yikes, not easy work. Yeah gonna need a new custom chip for that blown section. This looks like a $150 in labor to repair $50 console scenario. Also def microscope territory.
 

Ergot

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The chip isn't blown. They probably broke off the legs trying to connect the RGB lines back up and then ground away the chip to reveal the traces inside, but ended up taking off too much. I think it might still be repairable with some fine wire and a steady hand.
 

deadlegion

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I would keep console B for the parts bin.
I have no idea if console A is worth repairing, I've never actually had any of these but I do have two Super Famicoms.
 
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