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SCPH-15000 Version Information

Obsidian

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Trying to find a bit of info out about my consoles version & Dr Google is being stupid.

Recently bought a bunch of Japanese Launch Consoles & I've repaired one that's been long broken.

My SCPH-15000 displays as SCPH-10000 in the version information.

Because the console has been broken for years, I can't for the life of me remember if it was displaying like that when I got it.

I've used an earlier PSU and DVD drive to repair it.

Any help would be appreciated.
 

Tokimemofan

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That’s normal all pcmcia models including test units do that except for the DTL-H10100 and possibly SCPH-18000. Can’t verify the latter because I’ve never owned one. The model number was hard coded on protokernal units
 

Obsidian

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possibly SCPH-18000.
Oh sweet cool.
Didn't think I had anything special, but was more curious, as all my other ones show the correct version information.

I'll check both of my SCPH-18000's (I haven't tested them yet) to see what they say.
 

Obsidian

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@Tokimemofan , just an fyi, the SCP-18000 has the proper version information. I'm guessing it's because it was the first one with the DVD driver built in.
 
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uyjulian

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You can use PS2Ident to ensure that the outer case and the mainboard match.
 
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joshuawthomson

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I have all SCPH-1xxxx's. Internally the 15000 and 10000 are pretty much identical, only difference is the DVD region checking stuff.
 
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Obsidian

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I have all SCPH-1xxxx's. Internally the 15000 and 10000 are pretty much identical, only difference is the DVD region checking stuff.


I pulled both of mine apart, and there's a little board attached to the 18000 that I'm assuming is the DVD board.

The 10000 & 15000 don't have a DVD Driver, these need to be installed.
 

VILLAIN

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I see this thread is a year old, but thought I would list some differences/facts between the SCPH-10000 and 15000:

1. The motherboard on the 10000 (GH001) is a lighter green colour, where as the 15000 (GH003) uses the darker green dye which has become synonymous with Playstation consoles (like PS5)

2. The chassis (centre frame) of the 15000 has a small square cut out under the heat spreader/sink location to place/bridge a black conductive pad between a chip on the DVD logic board and the heat spreader - this is absent on the 10000.

3a. Contrary to belief, you can still boot the 1.0 Utility Disc on the 15000 and it will attempt to copy the DVD Player to the Memory Card, until the process fails about half way through - this will subsequently create a 'Broken Data' block on the Memory Card.

3b. You can insert a Memory Card into the 15000 where the 1.0 DVD Player was created on a 10000, but the system will report that the "DVD Player is Not Set Up" if you try and play a movie. Pressing Triangle on the main screen does however report you have 'DVD Player 1.0' because the software is only blacklisted on the Boot-Rom.

4. 15000 produces slightly better RGB than the 10000.

5. Kinks related to the DVD Drive were mostly ironed out in the 15000, and they generally use the improved KHS-400B laser.

6. All 15000 models report as 10000' (as stated earlier in this thread) because this revision was solely created to improve the overall Disc Drive and patch the DVD exploit - albeit unsuccessfully!

7. 10000 models generally starting with a J2XXXXXX serial (April 2000) come with Utility Disc 1.01 and may have the (i) Boot-Rom patched to block DVD Player 1.0 and (ii) Mechanon patched to increase the speed of the Disc Tray - the latter was to prevent the drive getting jammed if the console took a knock.

N.B. Some J0XXXXXX/J1XXXXXX secondhand units purchased from Japan may come with Utility Disc 1.1 where the original owner would have mailed the 1.00 disc back to Sony to receive the updated one.

Hope this helps someone out.
 
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Tokimemofan

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On the last point are you sure the Mechacon is different or is it the bootrom? I know the bootrom is definitely different on late 10k units
 

VILLAIN

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On the last point are you sure the Mechacon is different or is it the bootrom? I know the bootrom is definitely different on late 10k units
Thanks, and amended 🙏

Sorry, I stumbled on this post late in the evening and mistakes were made. I have always understood (and you're right) that it was the Boot-Rom that was patched for the DVD Player and the Mechanon for the speedier Disc Tray.

I knew an importer/exporter who used to practically buy these from source, and was the Fount of Knowledge. He told me the 15000 was intended as the 10100 (GH002) revision to address a possible grounding scenario which would lead to the RAM being damaged.

Another interesting fact is how some of the 10000 models have fingerprint acid corrosion (which develops over time) on the bottom shielding. This was due to some models being pulled before distribution to manually reprogram the Boot-Rom and Mechanon using the test points. I think this mainly affects the Minokamo units - which is where the bulk of launch units were manufactured.

There are some real strange versions of the PS2 that were being trialled around the time of the 18000-30000 switch. I used to own a DTL-H30002 Debugging Station (with the Expansion Bay) and it had an equivalent motherboard to the 15000/18000, but cut in half and both parts sandwiched on top of each other - near impossible to dismantle if you needed to change the clock battery!
 
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VILLAIN

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I thought I would add an update after pulling out my SCPH 10000/15000 motherboards from storage.

In the main picture: from left to right are (1) SCPH-10000 (v1.0), (2) SCPH-10000 (v1.1), and SCPH-15000. These were all pulled from machines manufactured in the Minokamo plant.

You can see the serial number (batch number?) on the 'GraphicsSynthesizer' is lower on the launch day machine.

Also worth noting (not pictured) the header on the wiring harness for the Power and Reset buttons is notched on the 15000, and therefore you would need to file the notches down if you transplant a 10000 motherboard into a 15000 centre chassis without replacing the harness from that 10000 donor unit also. The mod is quite easy and doesn't affect functionality. You won't run into this problem if you transplant a 15000 board into a 10000 centre chassis - they either changed suppliers or were rethinking design principles shortly after launch.

20211002_112800.jpg

20211002_112806.jpg20211002_112810.jpg20211002_112815.jpg
 
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Obsidian

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Wow, that's fantastic information.

I'm going to have to pull mine apart and check which versions I have now.
 
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VILLAIN

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Thanks 😉

Try not to pull your machine apart though. The serial number is a good indicator which version you have, or you could use the 'ident' app (which 'uyjulian' alluded to) to check the Boot-Rom version - all versions of the 10000 are almost identical in appearance.

The 10000 and 15000 (the latter to a lesser extent) are quite fragile, and you could upset something which results in the Clock Generator and/or RAM failing.
 
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Obsidian

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Thanks 😉

Try not to pull your machine apart though. The serial number is a good indicator which version you have, or you could use the 'ident' app (which 'uyjulian' alluded to) to check the Boot-Rom version - all versions of the 10000 are almost identical in appearance.

The 10000 and 15000 (the latter to a lesser extent) are quite fragile, and you could upset something which results in the Clock Generator and/or RAM failing.
Yeah, I've used indent a few times before.

I prefer HDProjectX, which dumps everything also.

I've pulled a couple of my 10000's and 15000's apart before. I'm very gentle ;).

I'd be interested in seeing the differences between them, not just from the Minokamo plant.
 
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VILLAIN

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Yeah, I've used indent a few times before.

I prefer HDProjectX, which dumps everything also.

I've pulled a couple of my 10000's and 15000's apart before. I'm very gentle ;).

I'd be interested in seeing the differences between them, not just from the Minokamo plant.
Sounds like you know your way around a Vintage Playstation!

I have always wanted an 'S KOHDA' manufactured SCPH-10000. 'Minokamo' were the most common launch units, followed by 'Kisarazu' which dominated the 15000 era (Summer 2000 production). If memory serves, 'SOLECTRON' represented all of the production plants mentioned above, and pretty much accounts for most (if not all?) the 18000 run of consoles.

I have also noted that the really early 10000 units start the fan at higher speed than later models (on cold boot) and then dial it down after about 15 minutes or so. This isn't an issue with dust or temps affecting older machines because I have changed the fan on one of these to a practically new one from another unit, and even improved the heat dissapation on the motherboard - better thermal pads, et cetera.
 
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nino

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@VILLAIN Would you mind updating this article with high resolution photos from both sides of GH-001 - GH-008 as well as expanding/updating/fixing any wrong information about them in the article? I've been working on this article for the past week and mostly was able to use my own high resolution pictures (e.g. for PSX XPD-001 or PS2 GH-006/GH-007), but I don't own any early japanese PS2 consoles, so I got pictures from other places on the internet and did a lot of guesswork based on the little information that is available about them. And now I just stumbled upon this thread which also happens to be active right now... that's fate lol

Would also be great if you could do the same to other motherboard revisions, if you own any.
 
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Obsidian

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Sounds like you know your way around a Vintage Playstation!

I've spent a fair few years repairing the Phat PS2. And learnt a lot about them over the years, I've never really looked into the physical differences between the motherboards though.

I have always wanted an 'S KOHDA' manufactured SCPH-10000. 'Minokamo' were the most common launch units, followed by 'Kisarazu' which dominated the 15000 era (Summer 2000 production). If memory serves, 'SOLECTRON' represented all of the production plants mentioned above, and pretty much accounts for most (if not all?) the 18000 run of consoles.

I'll have to check which models I have. I definitely have an SCPH-18000 'SOLECTRON', but unsure about my earlier models.

I have also noted that the really early 10000 units start the fan at higher speed than later models (on cold boot) and then dial it down after about 15 minutes or so. This isn't an issue with dust or temps affecting older machines because I have changed the fan on one of these to a practically new one from another unit, and even improved the heat dissapation on the motherboard - better thermal pads, et cetera.

That's interesting. Another thing I've never picked up on o_O, but you can bet that I'll checking for it now.
 

VILLAIN

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I've spent a fair few years repairing the Phat PS2. And learnt a lot about them over the years, I've never really looked into the physical differences between the motherboards though.



I'll have to check which models I have. I definitely have an SCPH-18000 'SOLECTRON', but unsure about my earlier models.



That's interesting. Another thing I've never picked up on o_O, but you can bet that I'll checking for it now.
I have a quick question for you though. Is the black conductive pad on the southbridge (underside) of any of your motherboards really dry and hard? I don't think I've ever opened a 10000 or 15000 in the past 15 years where this isn't the case - so wonder if that's the way it was always meant to be even though the EE/GS pads are still soft.

The chip I am referring to is on the top left when you take the shielding off the motherboard.

I am contemplating changing it to a 1.5mm Arctic Thermal pad on my 10000 - if it's dried up.
 

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