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[article] The six great reasons to share prototypes

Borman

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That's precisely what we don't want to do. We're in the middle of a 90,000 square foot expansion too, with the two indoor gallery spaces dedicated solely to video games. In fact, the storage space with the expansion will mostly be used for video games too. One is centered around our World Video Game Hall of Fame (with plenty of other stuff around it), while the other is an immersive gallery that will have you doing actions inspired by video games, hopefully something that has never been seen before. We're still planning out exactly what will be in there, but there will be a lot of space for some unique artifacts in there, it's an exciting time!
 

FamilyGuy

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That's precisely what we don't want to do. We're in the middle of a 90,000 square foot expansion too, with the two indoor gallery spaces dedicated solely to video games. In fact, the storage space with the expansion will mostly be used for video games too. One is centered around our World Video Game Hall of Fame (with plenty of other stuff around it), while the other is an immersive gallery that will have you doing actions inspired by video games, hopefully something that has never been seen before. We're still planning out exactly what will be in there, but there will be a lot of space for some unique artifacts in there, it's an exciting time!
A videogame museum really has to be interactive to be pertinent IMO. It's great that the one you're working at realized that.

Would you be open to someone loaning a item for preservation even if they want to keep the original? I could see this as a kind of win-win for some collectors that are shy about doing a public, legally ambiguous release, and don't really want to donate the physical items.

I think preservation isn't necessarily releasing publicly, but at least making it available to scholars and historians the future. Public is good, but making videos, taking pictures, documenting, and sharing information about rare items are valid contributions. Private backup for posterity and donations to museums like Strong are a good way to preserve videogames history even if it doesn't mean that everyone can get it via torrents.
 
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Borman

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We've taken digital items if that's what you are getting at. We do require a deed of gift to be signed.
 

FamilyGuy

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We've taken digital items if that's what you are getting at. We do require a deed of gift to be signed.
Would you dump a proto and return the physical item given that you could keep the backup for the museum? Or the owner would have to dump it himself before sending it to you as a gift?

I'm just wondering BTW, I have nothing of sorts to offer, just curious.
 

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Not focused solely on preservation, but actually mentions the difficulties online stores brought up on last gen and the dark future of live services.

 
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